Category Archives: Videos

The Sensor Plane Photography Podcast: Episode #4

I had a chance to sit down with Tony Sweet for this episode of The Sensor Plane podcast. Tony and I discuss the recent advances in mirrorless camera systems; he’s started using the Fujifilm X Pro-1 and he recently took it on a photo workshop he led in Havana, Cuba.

Check out the interview here:

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Download an audio-only version of the podcast here (mp3 format)

 

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The Sensor Plane Photography Podcast: Episode #3

Welcome to Episode 3 of The Sensor Plane photography podcast! Today, I’m talking tripods, heads, and why you need one. More importantly, I discuss the salient features to look for when choosing a tripod and head.

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Audio only (mp3 format) download here

My current tripod recommendations

Gitzo 2542L Carbon Fiber Tripod Legs
Holds just about anything except for large lenses like 300mm and up. This has a center column, which I removed and replaced with a Markins baseplate kit.

Gitzo 3-series 4-section tripod (long)
This tripod can hold a 600mm f/4 in a pinch. It’s perfect for just about anything, and doesn’t include a center column.

I use Really Right Stuff ball-heads and camera plates/brackets.

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The Sensor Plane Photography Podcast: Episode #2

Use creative white balance to set the mood in your images.
Use white balance to set the mood in your images.

Today on the Sensor Plane I want to talk a little about an oft-overlooked creative tool: white balance. You can use the camera white balance setting to change the mood and feel of your images both directly in camera or in post. While it’s important to get proper white balance in your shots, remember that if you shoot in RAW it’s very easy to adjust after the fact.

The Sensor Plane Photography Podcast with Jason Odell

Episode 2: Creative White Balance

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Download an audio-only version of The Sensor Plane Episode #2 here.

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The Sensor Plane Photography Podcast: Episode #1

Sensor-Plane-logo

Welcome to my latest project, a video blog called The Sensor Plane. In digital photography, the sensor plane is where light rays interact with technology. Starting today, I’ll be hosting a regular segment where I’ll talk about the technical and creative sides of digital photography.

In today’s episode, I’ll start off with a review of the two Nikon 70-200mm zoom lenses:

Here my thoughts on the practical aspects of these lenses in the video episode below. If you have suggestions for future topics, please feel free to leave a comment!

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Update Jan. 7, 2014

Some viewers have requested an audio-only version of the episode. I’ve posted a MP3 version here: Sensor Plane #1 (Audio Only) 

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Think Globally, Act Locally (With Video Tutorial)

Turquoise Lake, CO. This image is a great example of how local adjustments will serve you better in post-processing. I enhanced the foreground rocks without affecting the smoothness of the water and background elements by applying Clarity via the Adjustment Brush in Lightroom 5.
Turquoise Lake, CO. This image is a great example of how local adjustments will serve you better in post-processing. I enhanced the foreground rocks without affecting the smoothness of the water and background elements by applying Clarity via the Adjustment Brush in Lightroom 5.

When it comes to post-processing your images, we’ve got a ton of tools to work with, both in our RAW editors and in plug-ins. Sometimes, though, I’ll see images that just look completely over-done. Usually this occurs when the photographer sees an effect and cranks it up really high. But the problem is bigger than that. Often, we’ll create images that have regions that look great with a particular effect, but at the expense of other areas. This is what happens when you apply adjustments globally (to the entire image).

The majority of adjustment tools operate globally; contrast, saturation, sharpening, etc. While we need to make global adjustments to set the foundation of our image, some adjustments can wreak havoc when applied globally. A good example is the Clarity slider in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. This slider affects local contrast (textures) and is extremely powerful. It’s also a tool that can quickly get out of hand. While certain features look great with added Clarity, other areas of the image can start to look extra-terrestrial.

The solution for these types of images is to place specific adjustments only where you need them. I like to use the Clarity slider to examine my image for areas that would benefit from its application, but then I’ll add the effect with the brush tool in Lightroom. The same technique applies to Photoshop users, who can use selection masks to add effects subtly to specific areas of their image.

Here’s a short video I made that illustrates the “Think Globally, Act Locally” paradigm for digital photographers.

[youtube_sc url=”http://youtu.be/NFv3zEgKFGU” title=”Digital%20photography%20tips%20with%20Jason%20P.%20Odell” fs=”1″]

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