Tag Archives: tips and tricks

Reminder: Set your Camera Clocks back for Standard Time

It’s quick and easy if your camera offers a DST function

Daylight Savings Time (DST) ended in North America on Sunday, November 3rd. That means, we’re back on Standard Time until March 8th, 2020. You probably forgot to change the clock on your camera, though!

Having the correct date and time set in your camera is important because the time stamp that’s embedded in your digital images can be used for record-keeping, and to sync up with GPS track logs.

Most cameras today offer an easy way to set the clock for Daylight Savings Time

Changing your camera’s clock is easy if it has a Daylight Savings Time function (Nikon Z7 shown)

First, find the “Time and Date” menu item in your camera’s settings. Next, see if there is a Daylight Savings or “DST” option. If so, simply set it to OFF and your camera’s clock will “fall back” one hour. If it was already set to OFF, then you’ll need to manually adjust the camera clock. In spring, when DST returns, change the DST setting to ON.

In the fall, set DST to OFF. Change it to ON in the spring!

Easy-peasy!

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Create a Floating Frame Effect for Your Photos

This cool floating frame effect is easy to create in Photoshop CC

Floating Frame effect in Photoshop
I used Adobe Photoshop to create the floating drop-shadow and border around this image.

I sometimes like to present my photos online with a nice “floating” effect. It’s easy to do in Adobe Photoshop, which is included when you subscribe to Adobe Lightroom Classic CC. Here’s how you do it:

 

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Long Exposure Photographs Are Simply Amazing

long exposure photographs
Use a long exposure to dramtically transform your scene from a snapshot to a work of art.

If you’re looking to transform your images from snapshots into stunning creative photos, try experimenting with long exposure photographs. All you need is a camera that supports bulb exposure mode,  a tripod, and in some cases a dark filter. In twilight conditions, long exposure photographs are pretty easy. Set your lens aperture to f/16 or f/22 and then set your camera’s ISO value to its the lowest possible setting.

To capture long exposure photographs during the day, you’ll need to add a dark filter to your lens. These filters, called a solid neutral density filters, enable you to capture a long exposure photograph during the day. In either case, keep in mind that you’ll need a solid tripod to make a long exposure photograph.

How Long Exposure Photographs Transform Your Images

Here are just a few ways how a long exposure photograph delivers maximum impact, especially in places that are popular with photographers. Use a long exposure and deliver dynamic images with the “wow” factor you can’t capture with a snapshot. Continue reading Long Exposure Photographs Are Simply Amazing

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Retina Macs: Setting Proper Screen Resolution in Photoshop

If you’re using one of the new iMacs or MacBooks with Retina Display for Adobe Photoshop, you may have noticed that your images look very small when selecting, View–> Print Size.  That’s because the retina display has a MUCH higher resolution than the typical CRT or LCD monitor. Most displays have a screen resolution around 72 pixels per inch (ppi), which is far less than what you get with a retina display.

Get the fix here:
Continue reading Retina Macs: Setting Proper Screen Resolution in Photoshop

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